Mudras

Mudras


Specific Mudras

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Aakash Vardhak

Aakash Vardhak

Aakash Vardhak Mudra / Vyom Mudra / Ether Element

How & When: Join the tip of the middle finger with the tip of the thumb, keeping the rest of the 3 fingers straight. One may perform this Mudra anytime of the day for any duration. The best time for practicing this Mudra is either morning time by sitting in Sukhasan or Padmasana. One must try to keep this Mudra intact for 45 minutes, though one may start with a shorter time period as per convenience and capacity.

Abhaya

Abhaya

( Gesture for promising protection )

Apan

Apan

Apan / Apana Mudra ( Energy Mudra / Mudra of Digestion )

Apan Vayu

Apan Vayu

Apan / Apana Vayu Mudra ( Heart Mudra / also called the Lifesaver : first aid for heart attacks )

Ardha

Ardha

Ardha Cakrasana ( Bridge )

Asthma

Asthma

Asthma Mudra

Atmanjali

Atmanjali

Atmanjali Mudra ( Gesture of prayer )

Place both hands together in front of your heart chakra. Leave a little hollow space between the two palms. At the beginning or close of the meditation, sit or stand for a while with your arms spread and raised to Heaven. Placing your hands together in front of your chest supports inner collection and creates harmony, balance, repose, silence, and peace. This gesture activates and harmonizes coordination of the left and right brain hemispheres. It can support a supplicatory meditation when you have a request of the Divine, when you have a heart's desire that you would like to have fulfilled. With this gesture, you also express reverence or gratitude. In India, it is a gesture of greeting or thanks; it shows respect for fellow human beings.

The ancient Celts and Teutons contacted their gods with raised arms. This gesture is very powerful and was prohibited during Christianization. Later, it was introduced once again. However, only the priests and members of religious orders - but no longer the common people - were permitted to use it. Who was meant to have the power here? In India and Nepal, people make this gesture toward holy people and to those they respect. As already mentioned, this mudra calms our thoughts and creates clarity as a result. Calming thoughts are always based on a certain power, power that builds up physical strength and stabilizes the mind, as well as clarifying and strengthening.

Imagine that you are at a holy place of power. Perhaps you know of a holy place of power that has special meaning for you. Then, in your thoughts, you can bring it to the privacy of your own room at any time. You can also visualize a place that harmonizes with your needs. Imagine this place as precisely as possible. At holy places, we feel a special energy. Try to also feel this energy within yourself. This mudra will bring you to the silence; whether you make a request, ask a question, give praise, or give thanks - if you are willing to be helped, you are certain to be helped at the right time and in the best way possible. At the end of the meditation, remain in silence for a while. Immerse yourself in the peace and joy of the Divine. Affirmation : Full of thankfulness, I receive the good that waits for me.

Back

Back

Data

Bhramara

Bhramara

Bhramara Mudra ( The bee )

Bhudi

Bhudi

Bhudi Mudra ( Fluid Mudra )

Bhumisparsha

Bhumisparsha

Bhumisparsha Mudra ( Gesture of enlightenment, or gesture of calling witnesses )

Bronchial

Bronchial

Data

Detoxification

Detoxification

Data

Dharmachakra

Dharmachakra

Dharmachakra Mudra ( Gesture of turning the wheel )

Dhyani

Dhyani

Dhyani Mudra ( Gesture of meditation-of contemplation )

Ganesha

Ganesha

Ganesha Mudras ( The elephant; Ganesha, the deity who overcomes all obstacles )

Garuda

Garuda

Garuda Mudra ( Garuda, the mystical bird )

Hakini

Hakini

Hakini Mudra ( Hakini - God of the Forehead [6th] Chakra ) / also known as mudra for Brain

THIS BOLD WORD ( SPECIAL TIPS ) BY Master Murugan (Certified Yogi RYT-500) : Did you ever wonder, everytime you thinking deep, your hand will automatically to this position and all fingers touch/untouch consistently at each finger tips. This is because your brain request your mudras to activate. This finger-tips of 10 fingers is mudras to assist brain think faster.

Place all the fingertips together. The Hakini Mudra can be practiced at any time. When you would like to remember something, or want to find the red thread again, place your fingertips together, direct your eyes upward, place the tip of your tongue on your gums while inhaling, and let the tongue fall again while exhaling. Then take a deep breath—and what you wanted should immediately occur to you. Moreover, when you must concentrate on something for a longer period of time, could use some good ideas, or want to remember something that you have read, this mudra can be useful. When doing mental work, don't cross your feet. Sit with your eyes facing west. This mudra can do true wonders, and you should always keep it in the back of your mind in case of an emergency.

In terms of science, this finger position has been researched quite well; researchers have determined that it promotes the cooperation between the right and left brain hemispheres. It is also recommended today in memory training and management courses. It is said to open access to the right hemisphere, which is where the memory is stored. This mudra also improves and deepens respiration, and the brain profits from it as well. In order to recharge the brain's energy, you can practice the Mahā Bandha or use these fragrance essences—lemon, rosemary, basil, or hyssop. According to Kim da Silva, the Hakini Mudra builds up the energy of the lungs. To activate the energy of the large intestine, shift the finger contact by one finger so that the right index finger is on the left thumb, your right middle finger is on your left index finger, etc.

HERBAL REMEDY: Lungwort ( Pulmonaria officinalis L. ) benefits the lungs.

You may also improve concentration and gather new mental powers by letting your gaze and thoughts rest on one object or a relaxing activity for a longer period of time. The following exercise also helps in this direction.

About three feet in front of you, imagine an object, such as a burning candle, a piece of fruit, or a stone. Look at the object as long as possible without blinking. Now close your eyes and try to imagine the object. Immediately let go of every rising thought not related directly to the object. Hold your concentration as long as you can.

Affirmation : Concentration is my strength.

InnerSelf

InnerSelf

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Jala Vardhak

JalaVardhak

Jala Vardhak Mudra / Varun Mudra / Water Element

How & When: One may perform this Mudra any time of the day by joining the little finger tip with the tip of the thumb, keeping the rest of the 3 fingers straight. One may perform this Mudra in sitting, lying down or standing pose. Though, the best pose is still the sitting cross legged pose.

Practice

When to Practice

In physics the time, space and observer are the 3 important factors. Exactly like that the time, space and the person connected with performing mudras are 3 important factors for deriving benefit of mudras. The ideal timings are the prabhata kaal ( morning ) and saayam kaal ( evening ). Mudras are generally practiced empty stomach.

Duration: Minimum 30 seconds to 45 minutes daily. It can be practiced in breaks, 3 times a day for a particular duration as per the capacity and convenience. Let your intuition function here.

You can actually practice the mudras at any time and in any place. Modern authors take the view that mudras can even be done while stuck in traffic, watching television, or when you have to wait for someone or something.

However, my opinion differs somewhat from this perspective for the following reasons: mudras should be done in a meditative, harmonious mood. Can you guarantee that while stuck in traffic you won't be stressed and fuming with annoyance because you aren't getting to where you want to go, or that you sit in front of the television because you are "relaxing" by watching a hard-core thriller or vehement political debate on taxes?

I invite you to do an interesting test: place your thumb and index finger together and think about something wonderful for a few minutes while you do this ( an experience in nature, winning at sports, sex, etc. ) - it doesn't matter what it is, as long as it lets you float on pink clouds. Now try to feel the energy that flows from the index finger to the thumb. Finished! Now do the same thing again, but this time imagine something terribly sad. Once again, feel the energy of the fingers. Do you notice a difference? You will certainly have discovered how dull the flow of energy felt the second time.

This little experiment shows me how important it is to practice mudras while in a good mood and in a positive atmosphere. Feelings and thoughts influence the energy fields and the flow of energy in a negative or positive manner, even if we don't notice it. This is no joking matter. As I will explain later, we want to engage these energy fields in a positive sense. This is why the basic tone of our momentary mood and situation is so important. However, there are also mudras and breathing techniques for serenity, patience, and composure. These can be used to initially get into the right mood. For example, when stuck in traffic, standing in line, or sitting on a train, we can first calm down and then begin practicing the actual mudra.

When holding a mudra while watching television or listening to the radio, one further factor should be taken into consideration the time we spend on a mudra should always be a time of self-communion as well. The only exceptions are special programs or music with a much more calming than stimulating effect on the nerves. If we have planned our days so poorly that we don't have three peaceful minutes, if we let ourselves constantly be exposed to the radio or television from our first waking moments until we fall asleep at night, then mudras actually have no place in our lives.

Mudras can truly be practiced almost anywhere and at any time, but only when we can also withdraw within ourselves almost anywhere and at any time. This really isn't all that difficult and can be learned, like everything else. It concerns our health-we need a few silent minutes now and then every day. These silent moments can be the most precious to us; and like the salt in the dough that gives the bread its good taste, silence adds the right spice to our lives.

A good time to practice mudras is a few minutes before getting up and a few minutes before falling asleep, before or after meals, when you walk somewhere ( we all need to walk a certain distance every day ), while on public transportation, or during breaks at work.

However, don't just try out a number of mudras in a row at random. Specifically select just one or two. Practice these according to a time plan. Decide when, how long, and how often you want to do them every day. Or plan to fill both the usual and unpredictable times with them when you have to wait. Practice only these mudras over the next few days. The effects may occur immediately, especially if you have acute complaints or mood swings. But it may also be that the effects you hope for only occur after several days. For chronic complaints, it usually takes several weeks or even months before an improvement takes place. Only patience can help here. Moreover, it is always worth it since many new perceptions can be gained and wonderful moments experienced, in addition to the desired healing. You should also know that when something changes within, there is a corresponding change in your surrounding world.

Every healing within also brings healing into your world. An illness in the body is always connected with thoughts and feelings that make people sick. A certain amount of time is required before healing takes place on every level. So allow yourself the time-practice ardently and remain completely serene and confident while doing so. Then the chances of healing will be the greatest.

How Long is a Mudra Held

The great masters do not agree on the length of time to practice a mudra position. The Indian mudra researcher Keshav Dev recommends holding one mudra per day for 45 minutes; chronic complaints can be eliminated in this way. If it isn't possible to do this, these 45 minutes can be divided into three time periods of 15 minutes each. The kinesiologist Kim da Silva, who has tested the effect of mudras over longer periods of time, recommends an individually, precisely determined time for holding each mudra. If you use a mudra as support for some type of therapy or to heal a chronic complaint, then I think it is beneficial to use it routinely, like a medication: every day at the same time and for the same length of time.

Mudras that are used for acute complaints - such as respiratory and circulation problems, flatulence, exhaustion, or inner restlessness-should be discontinued when the appropriate effect is achieved. Other mudras can be practiced for 3 to 30 minutes, two to four times a day. Using a stopwatch is the ideal way to time them. The time specifications that I have assigned to the individual mudras are meant to be an orientation aid, but not a dogma. You will also notice that your hands, especially the fingers, will become increasingly sensitive and respond to the mudras much more quickly after they have been given some training. If you need 5 minutes at the start to feel the effect of a mudra, in time you will only need 10 breaths. This is a wonderful experience! However, if you are confined to your bed, then you have enough time and should permit yourself to make good use of it. Also let the visualizations and affirmations continue to have their lasting effect afterward. You can use this time for your own benefit, for the healing of the body, mind, and soul.

The effect of a mudra may be perceived immediately or only after a certain amount of time. You start to feel warm, the sense of unwellness and pain fade away, your mood improves, and your mind is refreshed. But exactly the opposite may occur at the start. You become tired, or start to feel cold and shiver. This is also a positive sign of the effect.

Mudras and Color

Colors influence our minds and our lives on every level. In color therapy, various shades of color are specifically applied to regenerate the organs and glands, as well as to activate the processes of elimination, respiration, and circulation. Colors also influence our moods and every type of mental activity.

Red

Stimulates the circulation, makes us alert, warms and relaxes, but can also bring out aggression;

Orange

Improves the mood, promotes lightness, stimulates sexuality, but can also stimulate superficiality;

Yellow

Stimulates digestion, makes us mentally alert, and lets life appear in a bright light, but it can also be obtrusive;

Green

Is generally calming; it regenerates on every level, and gives us the desire to start something new;

Blue

Is also calming, but this calmness goes deeper and provides a sense of security; it conveys protection, and symbolizes the silent yearning for the incomprehensible;

Violet

Is the color of transformation, change, and spirituality;

Brown

Is the color of stability and connection to the earth, but too much can lead to stagnation;

White

Bears the entire spectrum of the other colors within itself, containing birth as well as death;

Black

Is the color of protection, of gathering strength, of retreat, and of the emptiness that already bears abundance within itself. Many teenagers like to wear black because they stand at the gateway of a new period of their lives. However, too much black weakens the organism, puts us in a sad mood, and promotes pessimism.

There are basically no "bad" colors, but it is important to use the right proportions. Every color can also be seen in our aura or energy body. When a color gains dominance or is not in its right place, it will initially have an effect on the general feeling of well-being. With time, a health disorder may develop as a result. However, the course of an illness can also be reversed with the help of colors.

It would go beyond the scope of this book to discuss the entire spectrum of colors used in healing. The following suggestions can help you have some good and beautiful experiences using color meditations. If you prefer a certain color, it may well be that you need the corresponding qualities. However, if you give too much preference to one color, this can develop into an addiction and the color may harm you.

While holding a mudra, you can either visualize a color or concentrate on the color of an object. The first approach is better because the color will then come to life, which means you can imagine the color as dark or light, dull or bright, connected to forms, or flowing, etc. For example, you feel the need to go into the forest because you can best regenerate yourself there but don't have the time to do so. You can imagine a very green forest, and in your thoughts, you can totally luxuriate in the green of the leaves. This will refresh you inwardly. Such visualizations have long been used successfully, and pictures of lush landscapes are specifically installed in many hospitals to support the healing process. Try it out!